NOW:53122:USA01012
http://widgets.journalinteractive.com/cache/JIResponseCacher.ashx?duration=5&url=http%3A%2F%2Fdata.wp.myweather.net%2FeWxII%2F%3Fdata%3D*USA01012
70°
H 81° L 57°
Clear | 3MPH

Practically Speaking

Kyle and her husband moved to Brookfield in 1986. She became active in local politics and started blogging in 2004. Her focus is primarily on local issues but often includes state and national topics, too. Kyle looks at things from the taxpayers' perspective in a creative, yet down to earth way, addressing them from a practical point of view.

Congressional Dems worry about Obama "fallout" this November

Elections, McCain 2008, Obama 2008

No doubt about it, people are fickle. Everyone loves a winner--especially when it comes to politics.

One day a candidate is the darling of the public, the next, they can be cast out like a stinky "old fish" in yesterday's newspaper. (Couldn't resist.)

Now some Democrats on Capitol Hill fear Obama fallout:

"Democratic jitters about the US presidential race have spread to Capitol Hill, where some members of Congress are worried that Barack Obama’s faltering campaign could hurt their chances of re-election.

... 

"Concern was greatest among first-term representatives who won seats in traditionally Republican districts in the landslide of 2006. “Several of them face a real fight to hold on to those seats,” the fundraiser said.

For years, conservatives like me have been frustrated by Republicans who continually moved to the center in an attempt to garner votes. The 2006 election proved this was not the right tact. Republicans lost their majority in Congress that year. In some areas, the Democrats who campaigned more to the right were the victors.

It is no secret John McCain frustrated conservatives by being too close to the center. We only gave McCain our lukewarm support because the Obama alternative was so horrifying to us. We would do our duty, hold our nose, and vote Republican. At least McCain was strong on national defense, lowering taxes, and pro life.

Enter Governor Sarah Palin. She epitomizes social conservative values, is more fiscally conservative than many, and seems to understand that less government, not more, is what people want. Those of us holding our noses suddenly want to catch the breath of fresh air Palin represents.

Conservatives and Republicans are energized, not because she is a woman, but because she represents what our party has so lacked in this election cycle: someone with Reagan-like ideas. The Republican convention drew more viewers than ever before; McCain's poll numbers are up.

Who can say what will happen in November. (My crystal ball is in the repair shop.) Governor Palin certainly has captured the attention of conservatives She compliments Senator John McCain's strong points and makes up for his weaknesses.

The fact that some Democrats up for reelection aren't so willing to stand in Obama's shadow on the campaign trail is quite a change from the days when they were so eager to bask in Obama's glow.

"A Democratic fundraiser for Congressional candidates said some planned to distance themselves from Mr Obama and not attack Mr McCain.

Their hesitation makes me believe I am not the only one who sees McCain/Palin as a winning team.

Please, comment content should relate to the subject of the post.

Posted comments do not necessarily reflect my views. Although I try to respond to many, do not interpret my lack of a response as agreement.

Links: 

 

counter hit xanga

Brookfield7, Fairly Conservative, Betterbrookfield, Mark Levin,  Vicki Mckenna

 

This site uses Facebook comments to make it easier for you to contribute. If you see a comment you would like to flag for spam or abuse, click the "x" in the upper right of it. By posting, you agree to our Terms of Use.

Page Tools