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Practically Speaking

Kyle and her husband moved to Brookfield in 1986. She became active in local politics and started blogging in 2004. Her focus is primarily on local issues but often includes state and national topics, too. Kyle looks at things from the taxpayers' perspective in a creative, yet down to earth way, addressing them from a practical point of view.

Food fight!

Food, Just for fun!

 Newsmax

THAT Lebanon is attacking Israel — over Falafel.

1st question: Is falafel, hummus, tabbouleh Lebanese or Israeli?

2nd question: Do you know what falafel, hummus, and tabbouleh is? 

Abbus Jerusalem of the Golden and Aladin are my 2 favorite middle eastern restaurants. Unfortunately, they are both on the east side of Milwaukee.   

Lebanon plans to file an international lawsuit charging Israel with violating a food copyright by marketing falafel, hummus, tabbouleh and other “Lebanese” dishes as Israeli.

Fadi Abboud, the president of the Lebanese Industrialists Association, said Israel is “taking the identity of some Lebanese foods.

“In a way, the Jewish state is trying to claim ownership of traditional Lebanese delicacies like falafel, tabbouleh, and hummus.”

Hummus is a dip made from chick peas, sesame paste, olive oil, lemon juice and garlic. Tabbouleh is a salad consisting of parsley, bulgur wheat, onions, and tomatoes, while falafel is a mixture of ground vegetables, usually chick peas, formed into balls and fried.

Abboud said Lebanese are losing “tens of millions of dollars annually” because Israel is selling traditional Lebanese dishes, the Israeli newspaper Haaretz reported.

“We are working on registering all the foods and ingredients which will be submitted to the Lebanese government so it can appeal to the international courts against Israel.”

Lebanon’s case will likely rely on the “feta cheese precedent,” Abboud said.

Six years ago, Greece won a monopoly on the production of feta cheese from the European Union by showing that the cheese had been produced in Greece under that name for several thousand years.

 

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